March 31, 2021

Feast of the Madonna dei Bagni

Madonna dei Bagni, ora pro nobis
Holy, or spy, Wednesday is the Feast of the Madonna dei Bagni, one of the so-called "Seven Sisters of Campania,” an appellation given to the region's major Marian devotions under different titles. Patroness of Scafati, Salerno, she gets the title Our Lady of the Baths from a fountain and spring renowned for their healing properties, especially for skin maladies, near where the sanctuary was later built. In celebration, I’m posting A Prayer to Our Lady for Healing. The image of the Madonna dei Bagni with St. John the Baptist and St. John the Evangelist comes courtesy of the Santuario Madonna dei Bagni in Scafati. Ave Maria.
A Prayer to Our Lady for Healing
Mary Immaculate, you have given yourself to us as our Lady of the Miraculous Medal. You have asked us to pray with confidence, and we will receive great graces. We know your compassion, because you saw your Son suffer and die for us. In your union with his suffering you became the mother of us all. Mary, my mother teach me to understand my suffering as you do and to endure it in union with the suffering of Jesus. In your motherly love, calm my fears and increase my trust in God's loving care.  According to God's plan, obtain for me the healing I need. Intercede with your Son that I may have the strength I need to work for God's glory and the salvation of the world. Amen. Mary, health of the sick, pray for us.

March 30, 2021

New Book: Stories from Pentamerone 

New title that may be of interest to our readers. Available at Amazon.com 

• Stories from Pentamerone by Giambattista Basile


Publisher: Independently published

Publication Date: February 26, 2021

Paperback: $26.99

Language: English

Pages: 376


Read description


Click here to see more books


Listing does not imply endorsement

March 28, 2021

Feast of San Giovanni da Capestrano

San Giovanni da Capestrano, ora pro nobis
March 28th is the Feast of San Giovanni da Capestrano, Franciscan friar and priest. Patron Saint of military chaplains and jurists, he is also the protector of Capestrano, a commune in the Province of L'Aquila (Abruzzo), where he was born in 1386. 
San Giovanni is revered as the "soldier saint" for his role in the valiant defense of Belgrade against the Ottoman Turks in 1456. With his fiery sermons, he helped raise a peasant army and assisted John Hunyadi, the heroic White Knight of Wallachia, in breaking the siege and routing the invaders. 
In celebration, I'm posting a Prayer in honor of St. John of Capistrano. Evviva San Giovanni!
Prayer to St. John of Capistrano
Lord, you raised up Saint John of Capistrano to give your people comfort in their trials. May your Church enjoy unending peace and be secure in your protection. We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen

Feast of the Pupazze

Photos of the Pupazze courtesy of Made in South Italy Today
Every year on Palm Sunday (Domenica delle Palme) in Bova Superiore, a scenic commune in the Province of Reggio Calabria, the locals celebrate the Messiah’s triumphal entrance into Jerusalem with a unique ritual known as the Feast of the Pupazze.

On Palm Sunday, as the name suggests, it is traditional for devotees to weave palm leaves into religious symbols. However, in southern Italy palm was hard to come by, so during the feast celebrants used olive branches instead. In Bova, this art form was taken to new heights. Townspeople skillfully weave ornate female figures out of the branches and adorn them with flowers and local produce. The verdure effigies are carried through the town in a colorful procession to the shrine of St. Leo, Bova’s beloved patron, where they are blessed. Continue reading

March 27, 2021

Upcoming Tridentine Masses at The Shrine Church of the Holy Innocents in NYC (March 29th — April 4th)

The Shrine & Parish Church of the Holy Innocents
128 West 37th Street, NYC 100018

• Monday, March 29th - Monday of Holy Week, 1st Class - Low Mass, 6:00 p.m.

• Tuesday, March 30th - Tuesday of Holy Week, 1st Class - Low Mass, 6:00 p.m.


LENTEN SERIES: On Tuesday Father Peter Stravinskas will lead us in reflections on the Holy Eucharist coming from sacred music, art and literature. The sessions will take place in the Parish Hall, following the 6 p.m. Mass. Meditation the Blessed Sacrament is always important, but it has special relevance during the holy Season of Lent. Make this program a key element in your Lenten observances -- and bring a friend.


• Wednesday, March 31st - Wednesday of Holy Week, 1st Class - Low Mass, 6:00 p.m.


• Thursday, April 1st - Holy Thursday, 1st Class - High Mass, 6:00 p.m. 


HOLY THURSDAY ALL-NIGHT ADORATION 

Following the Evening Mass of the Lord’s Last Supper on Holy Thursday, there will be all night adoration of the Most Blessed Sacrament at the Repository until the 3:00 p.m. Good Friday Liturgy. Please commit to a specific time of adoration that night by signing the sign-up sheet on the bulletin board in the vestibule. Please respond to our Lord’s question to the three Apostles that first Holy Thursday: “Could you not watch one hour with Me?” The Church will close at 12 midnight for those not staying all night and will reopen at 6:00 a.m. on Good Friday. 


• Friday, April 2nd - Good Friday


GOOD FRIDAY

Day of Fast & Abstinence! 

Adoration of the Most Blessed Sacrament at the Repository continues until 3:00 p.m. 

Confessions: 7:30-8:30 a.m.; 12 noon-3:00 p.m.; 5:00-5:30 p.m. 

Three Hours Agony Devotions 12 noon - 7 Last Words preached by Rev. Fr. James L. P. Miara, Pastor 

Afternoon Liturgical Service 3:00 p.m. in the Traditional Latin Rite Stations of the Cross - 6:00 p.m. 

 

• Saturday, April 3rd - Holy Saturday/Easter Vigil, 1st Class - High Mass, 6:00 p.m.


HOLY SATURDAY 

Paschal Fast: It is recommended to Abstain from meat and to Fast today in preparation for Easter 

Church opens at 9:00 a.m. for Veneration of the Cross and visits to the Lord’s Tomb. 

Confessions: 12 noon-1:00 p.m.; 3:00-4:00 p.m. 

Traditional Blessing of Easter Food 1:00 p.m. 

2nd Day of Divine Mercy Novena & Chaplet and First Saturday Devotions 5:00 p.m.
First Saturday Devotions will consist of the recitation of the Rosary and 15 minute meditation. The Communion of Reparation is received at the Easter Vigil Mass 

Easter Vigil Service and First Mass of Easter
6:00 p.m. in the Traditional Latin Rite 


• Sunday, April 4th - Easter Sunday, 1st Class - Low Mass, 9:00 a.m., High Mass, 10:30 a.m. 


EASTER SUNDAY Holy Masses 

9:00 a.m. Traditional Latin Low Mass
10:30 a.m. Traditional Latin High Mass followed by Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament 

Divine Mercy Novena & Chaplet - 10:15 a.m. 

Vespers & Benediction - 2:30 p.m. 

Confessions: 9:45-10:30 a.m. & 12 noon-12:30 p.m. 

FESTIVE RECEPTIONS/COFFEE HOURS 

In the Parish Hall following the Easter Vigil Mass and also the 10:30 a.m. Mass on Easter Sunday 


EASTER NOVENA OF MASSES 

A nine day novena of Holy Masses in honor of Our Risen Lord will take place at Holy Innocents beginning on Easter Sunday and ending on the day after Divine Mercy Sunday. Envelopes for this purpose are located throughout the church. Please return the envelope with the names of all those you wish to remember in this special series of Masses to the rectory, collection basket, or any of the offering boxes in the church by Holy Week so they can be placed on the altar for Easter. 


Source: March 28, 2021 Bulletin

Holy Week at the Pontifical Shrine & Parish Church of Our Lady of Mount Carmel in East Harlem, New York

March 26, 2021

Friday of Sorrows

Madonna Addolorata, ora pro nobis
The Friday before Palm Sunday is the Friday of Sorrows, a prelude to Holy Week and a solemn remembrance of the Blessed Mother’s grief and desolation at the foot of the Cross. In commemoration I’m posting a prayer to Our Lady of Sorrows by St. Alphonsus Liguori. The accompanying photo of the Madonna Addolorata was taken in the basement chapel at St. Athanasius Church in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn. Ave Maria.
Prayer to Our Lady of Sorrows
I compassionate thee, O most sorrowful Mother! Thy heart was pierced with a sword of grief when Simeon foretold to thee in the Temple the ignominious death and the desolation of thy Divine and most dear Son, which thou west destined one day to witness. By the great anguish of thy suffering heart, O gracious Queen of the universe, impress upon my mind, in life and in death, the sacred Passion of Jesus and thine own sorrows. Amen.

March 25, 2021

Feast of the Annunciation

The Annunciation by Renato Rossi, hand painted ceramic tiles on the facade of the Confraternity of Annunziata and Rosario (next door to the Chiesa San Giovanni) in Vietri sul Mare. Photos by New york Scugnizzo
The Feast of the Annunciation and the Mystery of the Incarnation, recalls when the Archangel Gabriel visited the Virgin Mary and announced she would conceive a Child by the Holy Spirit. It is also the traditional day to make your total consecration to Our Lord Jesus Christ through the Blessed Virgin Mary. 
In celebration, I'm posting The Angelus, a devotional prayer honoring the Blessed Mother's role in the Incarnation, which should be repeated three times daily (morning, midday and evening).
The Angelus

Prayer at dawn:

The Angel of the Lord declared unto Mary:
And she conceived by the Holy Spirit

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.


Prayer at noon:

Behold the handmaid of the Lord:
Be it done unto me according to Thy Word.
Hail Mary…

Prayer at twilight:

And the Word was made flesh:
And dwelt among us.
Hail Mary…

Conclusion after each prayer time:

Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God,
That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Let us pray: Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord. Amen

Feast of the Madonna di Picciano

Madonna di Picciano, ora pro nobis
March 25th is the Feast of the Madonna di Picciano and the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, protectress of the Santuario della Madonna overlooking the nearby hamlet of Picciano in Matera. Once guarded by the Knights Templar and later the Knights of Malta, the ancient sanctuary continues to draw pilgrims attracted to the miraculous image of the Blessed Mother, despite its suppression during the Napoleonic age. In celebration, I'm posting a Prayer for the Feast of the Annunciation. The accompanying photo of the sanctuary’s wooden processional statue comes courtesy of Andrew Giordano. Evviva Maria!

Prayer for the Feast of the Annunciation

O God, Who wast pleased that the eternal Word, according to the declaration of the angel, should take flesh in the womb of the Blessed Virgin Mary: Give to our humble petitions; and grant that we, who believe her to be truly the Mother of God, may be helped by her prayers. Through the same Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, one God, world without end. Amen.

March 24, 2021

Feast of San Gabriele Arcangelo

San Gabriele Arcangelo, ora pro nobis
March 24th is the Feast of San Gabriele Arcangelo, the exalted messenger of God. He is the patron saint of postmen, diplomats, messengers and telecommunication workers. 
In celebration, I’m posting a Prayer to Archangel Gabriel. The accompanying photo of The Annunciation by Luca Giordano was taken at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. Evviva San Gabriele!
A Prayer to the Archangel Gabriel
O Blessed Archangel Gabriel, we beseech thee, do thou intercede for us at the throne of divine Mercy in our present necessities, that as thou didst announce to Mary the mystery of the Incarnation, so through thy prayers and patronage in heaven we may obtain the benefits of the same, and sing the praise of God forever in the land of the living. Amen.

Feast of Sant’Aldemaro da Capua

The Abbey of Monte Cassino
March 24th is the Feast Day of Sant’Aldemaro il Saggio (St. Aldemar the Wise), Abbot and miracle worker. Born in Capua, as a young boy he was sent to the Abbey of Monte Cassino, where he became a Benedictine monk. Renowned for his wisdom and holiness, he was appointed rector of the Monastery of San Lorenzo di Capua, which was founded by the Lombard Princess Aloara (d.992). Performing many miracles, Sant’Aldemaro was eventually recalled to Monte Cassino by his superiors, which caused a bitter dispute between the Abbot Aligerno (949-86) and the Princess. Wanting no part in the quarrel, Sant’Aldemaro moved on to Boviano in Molise, where he miraculously escaped a crossbow attack by a man outraged by his brother’s generous donation of land to the Saint. Relocating again, Sant’Aldemaro settled in Bocchignano, Abruzzo, where he founded the Monastery of Santa Eufemia. Traveling around the Diocese of Chieti preaching and performing miracles, he built several more religious houses before dying in 1080.

In celebration, I’m posting a prayer to St. Aldemar the Wise. The accompanying photo was taken during my 2007 pilgrimage to the Abbey of Monte Cassino in Southern Italy. Sant'Aldemaro da Capua, ora pro nobis.

Prayer to St. Aldemar the Wise

Grant, we beseech Thee, almighty God, that the examples of St. Aldemar the Wise may effectually move us to reform our lives; that while we celebrate his festival, we may also imitate his actions. Look upon our weakness, almighty God, and since the burden of our own deeds weighs heavily upon us, may the glorious intercession of St. Aldemar protect us. Through Christ our Lord. Amen.

March 22, 2021

Celebrating the Feast of San Giuseppe in Brooklyn, New York

We erected a small St. Joseph's
Table by the front window
Members and friends of the Fratelli della Santa Fede (Brothers of the Holy Faith) returned to Amunì Ristorante (7217 3rd Avenue) in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn Friday evening to celebrate the Feast of San Giuseppe. Chef Vincent Dardanello outdid himself again and treated us to a veritable abbondanza of delicious Sicilian fare, including the perfectly cooked pesce spada alla griglia and alici fritte.

Having given up meat, eggs and dairy for Lent, revelers made the most of the solemnity and partook of some cheese, eggs (in the rice balls) and of course the pastries. However, despite the dispensation, we still insisted no meat be on the menu.


Special thanks to our friends at the Italian American St. Joseph Society of New Orleans, the San Rocco Society of Potenza in New York City, and the Madonna della Neve Society of Williamsburg, Brooklyn for joining us. It is always a great joy to celebrate our faith and culture together. Evviva San Giuseppe!

La Tavola di San Giuseppe
Tony made his world famous pane di San Giuseppe
Guests were given blessed prayer cards, medals and packets of lucky fava beans
A good time was had by all
Caponata
Carciofi fritti
Mixed seafood salad
Arancini
Fried anchovies
Insalata di finocchio
Eggplant parmigiana
Sautéed greens with pine nuts
Pasta con sarde with toasted breadcrumbs
Pasta alla Norma
Stuffed calamari
Grilled swordfish
Sfingi
Zeppole and sfingi di San Giuseppe
Salvatore, Stephen and Lucia
Tony and Loreto
Pamela and Raffaele
Vinny and Elena
Isaac, Andrea "BTB", Francesco "il gatto nero" and Frank

Happy Twelfth Anniversary

Twelve years and a million and a half visitors is a modest milestone in terms of the internet, but for us it is truly a joyous occasion. Hopefully we have another twelve in us, though the way things are going lately this may not be totally up to us. While I don’t want to overstate our influence or importance, I certainly don’t want to underestimate the vindictive pettiness of our adversaries. The fragile Jacobin mindset is hateful and malicious, and unable to cope with any dissent from their twisted worldview. Hell bent on world domination, any and all opposition to their malevolent designs, no matter how seemingly insignificant or small, must be rooted out and extirpated in the name of progress.  

Preparing for the worst, we’ve been backing up our material in case we fall victim to the online purge currently baby-proofing the web for the ridiculously sensitive and intolerant masses. Who knows, we just may have to start up an old-school samizdat style journal similar to the underground fanzines we use to publish back in high school with nothing but a typewriter, photocopier and a desire to be heard. 


Online censorship aside, we also have to contend with a growingly hostile environment. The steady decline of New York City into an unlivable hellscape makes it harder and harder to gather in public with family and friends. Fear of crime, overcrowding, skyrocketing costs, and crumbling infrastructure were issues before the COVID meltdown, now the draconian lockdown, partisan politics, and government incompetence has made it virtually impossible for us to do more than have a few small scale celebratory dinners and (excluding the unjustified period of church closures) attend the Traditional Latin Mass together.


Naturally, all plans to reboot our book and chess clubs or start new stamp and fencing clubs are on hold for the foreseeable future. To the best of our ability we are trying to maintain our religious and charitable endeavors, including spiritual warfare, the corporal works of mercy and heroic acts of charity. As for the blog, we can’t make any promises. We will continue to write and publish for as long as we like or until our technocratic overlords jettison us down the proverbial memory hole.


A big heartfelt thank you to all our loyal readers and contributors, even the lovable nitpickers who help keep us on our toes. Your support and prayers are greatly appreciated and inspire us to do better. God bless you all.


 ~ Giovanni di Napoli, March 21st, The Feasts of Bl. Maria Candida of the Eucharist and San Benedetto da Nursia

March 21, 2021

Passion Sunday

Angel holding the Sudarium, Vatican
The fifth Sunday of Lent is Passion Sunday and marks the beginning of Passiontide, the last two weeks of Lent. The first of the two weeks is known as Passion Week, and the second as Holy Week. During this period all sacred images (statues, icons, etc.), except for the Stations of the Cross, are veiled with violet cloth, signifying Christ’s hiding from the Jews (John 8:59) until he entered Jerusalem (commemorated on Palm Sunday). The Júdica Me psalm and Glória Patri doxology are omitted from the Masses for the same reason. The images will remain covered until the Glória is sung on Holy Saturday, which signals the ending of Lent and the beginning of Eastertide. During this solemn stretch, meditation on the Passion of Christ (the suffering and death of our Lord) is to be our principal point of focus. 

In celebration, I’m posting the anthem and prayer for Passiontide from Blessed Be God: A Complete Catholic Prayer Book by Very Rev. Charles J. Callan, OP., S.T.M. and Very Rev. John A. McHugh, OP., S.T.M (Preserving Christian Publications, 2010). The accompanying photo of the Angel holding St. Veronica's Veil by Cosimo Fancelli was taken during my 2007 visit to the Ponte Sant' Angelo (Bridge of Angels) in the Eternal City. On this day in Rome, the Sudarium, or Veil of Veronica, used to wipe the Volto Santo (Holy Face) of Jesus while He marched the Via Dolorossa (Sorrowful Path) to Golgotha is briefly revealed for veneration. 

A Prayer for Passiontide 

Ant. It behooves us to glory in the Cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, in Whom is our salvation, life, and resurrection, by Whom we are saved and delivered. 
V. Spare, O Lord, spare Thy people. 
R. Whom Thou hast redeemed with Thy Precious Blood. 

Let us pray 
O God, Whom to love above all is righteousness, multiply in us the gifts of Thy ineffable grace; and since Thou hast given us, in the death of Thy Son, to hope for those things which we believe grant us in the Resurrection of the same to attain the end to which we aspire. Who liveth and reigneth forever and ever. Amen.

Feast of San Benedetto da Nursia

San Benedetto, ora pro nobis
March 21st is the Feast of San Benedetto da Nursia (St. Benedict of Nursia), Patriarch of Western monasticism. Patron saint of Europe and Pertosa in Salerno, he is also the protector of monks, architects, engineers, speleologists and spelunkers. In celebration, I'm posting a Prayer to St. Benedict of Nursia. The accompanying photo, courtesy of Andrew Giordano, was taken at the Monastery of Santa Maria di Picciano in Matera, Basilicata. Evviva San Benedetto!
A Prayer to Saint Benedict
Dear Saint Benedict, I thank God for showering you with His grace to love Him above all else and to establish a monastic rule that has helped so many of His children live full and holy lives. Through the cross of Jesus Christ, I ask you to please intercede that God might protect me, my loved ones, my home, property, possessions, and workplace today and always by your holy blessing, that we may never be separated from Jesus, Mary, and the company of all the blessed. Through your intercession may we be delivered from temptation, spiritual oppression, physical ills, and disease. Protect us from drug and alcohol abuse, impurity and immorality, objectionable companions, and negative attitudes. In Jesus' Name. Amen.

Feast of Bl. Maria Candida of the Eucharist

Bl. Maria Candida, ora pro nobis
“When I was still a child, and before I was old enough to receive Jesus in Communion, I used to rush to the front door to greet my mother when she returned from Mass. There I stood on tiptoe to reach up to her and cried, 'I want God too!' My mother would bend down and softly breathe on my lips; I immediately left her, and placing my hands across my chest, full of joy and faith, jumping for joy I would keep repeating: 'I have received God too! I have received God too!”
March 21st is the Feast of Bl. Maria Candida of the Eucharist, Virgin and Mystic. Born on January 16, 1884 in Catanzaro, Calabria, Maria Barba felt the calling to a religious life at an early age, but was discouraged by her family. Receiving her First Holy Communion on April 3, 1894 in Palermo, Sicily (her parents' hometown), she had a strong devotion to the Eucharist. Finally entering the Order of the Discalced Carmelites in 1919, she assumed the name Maria Candida of the Eucharist and made her solemn profession on April 23, 1924. Eventually serving as Prioress and Mistress of Novices at her convent in Ragusa, Sicily, Mother Candida wrote extensively about the Mystery of the Eucharist. She died of cancer on June 12, 1949. 

Relic at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel
Church in Newark, New Jersey
During his homily at the Beatification of Four Servants of God in St. Peter’s Square on March 21, 2004, the Fourth Sunday of Lent, Pope St. John Paul II said of her
Maria Barba became a 'new creature' who offered her entire life to God in Carmel, where she received the name Maria Candida of the Eucharist. She was an authentic mystic of the Eucharist; she made it the unifying centre of her entire life, following the Carmelite tradition and particularly the examples of St. Teresa of Jesus and of St. John of the Cross. 
She fell so deeply in love with the Eucharistic Jesus that she felt a constant, burning desire to be a tireless apostle of the Eucharist. I am sure that Bl. Maria Candida is continuing to help the Church from Heaven, to assure the growth of her sense of wonder at and love for this supreme Mystery of our faith.
In celebration, I’m posting the Carmelite Prayer for Blessed Maria Candida. The photo of the relic of Bl. Maria Candida at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church in Newark, New Jersey comes courtesy of Eric Lavin. Evviva Beata Candida!

Carmelite Prayer

All-powerful and ever-living God, Who, by the breath of the Spirit, inspired Blessed Maria Candida, virgin, to contemplate the riches of the Eucharist, by her intercession, grant we beseech you, that gratefully offering the sacrifice of the Body and Blood of Christ, in union with the Blessed Virgin Mary, we may always glorify You in this Sacrament, Who lives and reigns with You in the unity of the Holy Spirit, God, forever and ever. Amen 

Sources:
• http://www.meditationsfromcarmel.com/content/blessed-maria-candida-euchrist
• http://www.vatican.va/content/john-paul-ii/en/homilies/2004/documents/hf_jp-ii_hom_20040321_beatifications.html 

• http://www.vatican.va/news_services/liturgy/saints/ns_lit_doc_20040321_candida_en.html

March 20, 2021

Happy Spring!

Photo by New York Scugnizzo
The March or vernal equinox marks the beginning of spring, a time of rebirth and fertility. In celebration of the new season I would like to share a poem by the acclaimed Sicilian poet and 1959 Nobel Laureate Salvatore Quasimodo from The Night Fountain: Selected Early Poems translated by Marco Sonzogni and Gerald Sawe, Arc Publications, 2008, p. 26-27. 
The accompanying photo of Primavera (Spring), or Flora, the goddess of fertility and springtime, from the Villa Arianna, Stabiae, first century AD, was taken at the Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli in 2010.
Wild Flowers

Blood clots hanging over torn green velvet:
the wounds of the fields!
Breathing in the sweet air, spring has broken
the veins of its swollen breasts.
Wind gusts with eager lips: a kiss!
Blood-red wild flowers float on threadlike
and foamless waves.

Primule

Grumi pensili di sangue sul lacero velluto verdognolo.
Oh le ferite dei prati!
La primavera respirando voluttuosamente l'aria soave, ha rotte
le vene del suo seno turgido.
Un fiotto di vento con le labbra avide; un bacio! E le
primule sanguigne galleggiano su l'onde filamentose e
senza spuma.

Upcoming Tridentine Masses at The Shrine Church of the Holy Innocents in NYC (March 22nd — 28th)

The Shrine & Parish Church of the Holy Innocents
128 West 37th Street, NYC 100018

• Monday, March 22nd - Passiontide Feria, 3rd Class - Low Mass, 6:00 p.m.


• Tuesday, March 23rd - Passiontide Feria, 3rd Class - Low Mass,  6:00 p.m.


LENTEN SERIES: On the Tuesdays of Lent (March 23rd & 30th), Father Peter Stravinskas will lead us in reflections on the Holy Eucharist coming from sacred music, art and literature. The sessions will take place in the Parish Hall, following the 6 p.m. Mass. Meditation the Blessed Sacrament is always important, but it has special relevance during the holy Season of Lent. Make this program a key element in your Lenten observances -- and bring a friend.


• Wednesday, March 24th - Passiontide Feria with Commemoration of St. Gabriel the Archangel, 3rd Class - low Mass, 6:00 p.m.


• Thursday, March 25th - Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, 1st Class - High Mass, 6:00 p.m. 

 

• Friday, March 26th - Seven Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin Mary with Commemoration of Feria, 3rd Class - low Mass, 6:00 p.m. 


FEAST OF OUR LADY OF SORROWS 

The Friday of Passion Week, March 26th, is the second Feast of Our Lady of Sorrows (the other being on September 15th). The Mass of Our Lady of Sorrows will be celebrated at 6:00 p.m. (Low Tridentine Latin). A Holy Hour in honor of Our Lady of Sorrows consisting of the recitation of the 7 Sorrows Chaplet, Sorrowful Mysteries of the Holy Rosary and other prayers to the Sorrowful Mother will begin at 5:00 p.m. As usual the Stations of the Cross will follow the 6:00 p.m. Mass. 


• Saturday, March 27th - Passiontide Feria, 3rd Class - Low Mass, 1:00 p.m.


• Sunday, March 28th - Palm Sunday (Passion Sunday II), 1st Class - Low Mass, 9:00 a.m., Chant Mass, 10:30 a.m. 


EASTER NOVENA OF MASSES 

A nine day novena of Holy Masses in honor of Our Risen Lord will take place at Holy Innocents beginning on Easter Sunday and ending on the day after Divine Mercy Sunday. Envelopes for this purpose are located throughout the church. Please return the envelope with the names of all those you wish to remember in this special series of Masses to the rectory, collection basket, or any of the offering boxes in the church by Holy Week so they can be placed on the altar for Easter. 


Source: March 21, 2021 Bulletin