January 3, 2017

Il Dizionario

Reprinted from the January 2017 Craco Society Bulletin
Prof. Dino (Berardino) D’Angella, the writer of the history of Craco (Note Storiche sul Comune di Craco) also authored a book about the briganti. Titled, “Brigantaggio Lucano Dell’ottocento Il Dizionario Briganti-Manutengoli, Fautori/Oppositori” (Brigandage of the 19th Century, A Dictionary, Brigands, Accomplices, Advocates/Opponents) it is of great value to us in several ways. 
Among the first pieces of information that emerged from the Archivio Privato Rigirone was the “Briganti List of Craco.” It contained the names of 58 men who were declared briganti. Prof. D’Angella enhances the information about many of the individuals on the list and his work identified 18 other individuals who were considered brigands that were not on the town’s list. This work also identifies individuals who were consider brigands from earlier periods when they opposed prior governments. 
The individuals in D’Angella’s book and the town’s briganti list and then reviewed against the Craco Society’s Family History Database. The results shows multiple connections to current members.
The additional individuals from Craco identified in Prof. D’Angella’s work are: 
1. Giovanni Baldassare (Craco) born 1840 to Giuseppe and Lucrezia Mazziotta. Farmer. Was part of a brigand band for a short time. 
2. Antonio Barnerio (Craco) was among the proponents of anti-French deaths in summer 1806. He joined the guerrillas and then became a band setting up his own band. Was particularly cruel at the sacking of Craco of July 18, 1807. 
3. Antonio Chiarito (Craco) actively participated in anti-French riots that broke out in the Basilicata region in July 1806. To avoid capture he joined the guerrillas led by Nicola Chiarito his parent. Captured while trading for weapons May 15, 1808 in Craco. 
4. Nicola Chiarito (Craco) took an active part in the anti-French riots in Basilicata in July 1806 and forming his own gang in the first half of 1807 operating in Matera and Positano. Among the various actions committed by the band is a raid of Craco on 10 May 1807. Died in conflict in 1809. 
5. Nicola Colabella (Craco) Born in 1840 to Nicola and Carmela Paduano. Brother of Carlo. He did not op-pose the entrance in Craco of the brigand Crocco. On November 14, 1861 he was accused of having supported the actions of the bandits Crocco, and Börjes and was shot with 15 other Crachesi in front of Craco’s Franciscan monastery. 
6. Don Giuseppe Colabella (Craco) Born 1830 to Nicola and Carmela Paduano. Priest. Supported the entry of briganti to Craco on November 14, 1861. A few days later, accused of having favored the action, was executed after summary trial, with another 15 Crachesi, on Nov. 24 in front of the Franciscan Monastery. 
7. Basilio DeSanto (Craco) Surveyor. In 1806 sided against the French, and the movement against the new government. Also in 1814 protested against the Murat government, and fearing to be arrested went into hid-ing. Arrested, he was sentenced to death in, February, 1815, but the sentence was commuted to life imprisonment. Received freedom in 1816 under the new Bourbon government. 
8. Giuseppe DiSisto (Craco) Born in 1811 of Antonio. Married to Clementina Caccitore. Farmer. Supported Crocco’s band in the countryside. On November 24, 1861, after summary trial, was shot in front of the Franciscan monastery. 
9. Francesco Franco (Craco) Born 1821 to Giuseppe and Maria Lopriello. Husband of Rosa M. Trionfo. Laborer. Did not oppose the entrance of the Crocco and Börjes bands into the village November 1861. Accused of aiding and abetting he was executed after summary trial, November 24, 1861 in front of the Franciscan Convent in Craco. 
10. Giuseppe LaLingua (Craco) Born in 1811. Married Grazia Lapadula. Laborer. Supported the November 1861 the entrance of the robbers in the town. Accused of having favored bandits was executed on November 24 in front of the Convent. 
11. Leonardo Lauria (Craco) Born in 1842 son of Giuseppe. Farmer. Joined a brigand band in November 1861. 
12. Nicola Matera (Craco) Born in 1823 to Pasquale and Domenica Veltre. He was part of Crocco’s band and was shot 24 November 1861 in Garaguso. 
13. Antonio Miadonna (Craco) Born 1818 to Tommaso and Maddelena Sassone. Lawyer. Did not oppose the entrance of the robbers in the town in November 1861. Accused of having favored the bandits and was executed on November 24 in front of the Convent. 
14. Francesco Plati (Craco) Born 1821 to Antonio and Vincenza Ferrante. Laborer. In November 1861 to join in brigand groups. 
15. Francesco Santalucia (Craco) Born 1843 to Nicola and Margharita Lobosco. Coffeemaker. Supported the November 1861 the entrance of the brigands to the town. Accused of aiding and abetting, he was executed after summary trial, November 24, 1861 in front of the Convent. 
16. Nicola Santalucia (Craco) Born 1815 to Angelo and Angiola Ferrante. Barber. Favored the entrance of the brigands to the town on November 14, 1861. Accused of aiding and abetting, he was executed after summary trial, November 24, 1861 in front of the Con-vent. 
17. Giuseppe Tozzuolo (Craco?) Born in 1844. Farmer, homeless. In December 1862 he was forced to join Crocco’s band. He was freed in exchange for weapons on January 13, 1863. 
18. Gaetano Viverito (Craco) Born 1829 to Giovanni and Lucia Simonetti. Farmer. Favored the entrance of the brigands to the town on November 14, 1861.